Poverty, crime linked to differences in newborns’ brains (Links to an external site)

Scanning the brains of newborns, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that maternal exposure to poverty and crime can influence the structure and function of young brains even before babies make their entrances into the world. Here, the university's Lourdes Bernardez prepares an infant for an MRI scan as part of ongoing research.

Scanning the brains of newborns, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that maternal exposure to poverty and crime can influence the structure and function of young brains even before babies make their entrances into the world. Here, the university’s Lourdes Bernardez prepares an infant for an MRI scan as […]

COVID-19 infection linked to higher risk of neuropathy symptoms (Links to an external site)

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found that many people who tested positive for the coronavirus in the early months of the pandemic also experienced peripheral neuropathy — pain, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet — during and following their bouts with COVID-19.

Adding to a growing body of evidence that, for many, problems related to COVID-19 linger longer than the initial infection, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that some people infected during the pandemic’s early months experienced symptoms of peripheral neuropathy — pain, tingling and numbness in the hands and […]

Saligrama part of team that received Wellcome Leap funding (Links to an external site)

Saligrama

Naresha Saligrama, an assistant professor of neurology and of pathology and immunology at the School of Medicine, is part of a team led by Lisa Wagar, of the University of California, Irvine, that has received multiyear, multi-million-dollar funding from Wellcome Leap to use human tonsil organoids to study immune responses. 

For accuracy, brain studies of complex behavior require thousands of people (Links to an external site)

Scientists rely on brainwide association studies to measure brain structure and function — using brain scans — and link them to mental illness and other complex behaviors. But a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Minnesota shows that most published brainwide association studies are performed with too few participants to yield reliable findings.

As brain scans have become more detailed and informative in recent decades, neuroimaging has seemed to promise a way for doctors and scientists to “see” what’s going wrong inside the brains of people with mental illnesses or neurological conditions. Such imaging has revealed correlations between brain anatomy or function and illness, suggesting potential new ways […]

Risk, resiliency in aging brain focus of $33 million grant (Links to an external site)

A functional MRI scan reveals the default mode network in the brain of a person at rest (above). Researchers with the Adult Aging Brain Connectome Study are collecting these and similar brain scans from 1,000 adults to study risk and resilience in the aging brain. The project, which involves researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other institutions, is funded by a $33.1 million grant from the National Institute on Aging.

A large study that investigates just what keeps our brains sharp as we age and what contributes to cognitive decline has been launched by researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Harvard University/Massachusetts General Hospital, the University of Minnesota Medical School and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).