New center’s aim: to ID biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases (Links to an external site)

Nicolas Barthélemy, PhD, an assistant professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, loads a sample into a mass spectrometer. Barthélemy uses mass spectrometry as part of his work at the university’s new Tracy Family SILQ Center for Neurodegenerative Biology. The center was established to help researchers discover, study and validate biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, with a goal of identifying new drug targets and creating better diagnostic and prognostic tests.

A new center established at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis aims to accelerate research into biomarkers of neurodegenerative conditions such as Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS) and the so-called tauopathies, a group that includes Alzheimer’s disease along with rarer diseases such as frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal syndrome […]

How St. Louis researchers are seeking ways to combat Alzheimer’s and dementia (Links to an external site)

ILLUSTRATION BY SWILLKLITCH / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

Alzheimer’s disease starts forming in the brains of unsuspecting individuals about 20 years before traditional telltale signs become noticeable. No cure exists for the progressive, fatal disease, but St. Louis medical researchers are studying tools and potential drugs that can detect and treat Alzheimer’s in its early stages. “The tests are getting better and better,” […]

Calming overexcited neurons may protect brain after stroke (Links to an external site)

By scanning the genomes of nearly 6,000 stroke patients, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis identified two genes associated with recovery. Both are involved in regulating neuronal excitability, suggesting that targeting overstimulated neurons may help promote recovery in the pivotal first 24 hours.

A new study has prompted scientists to reconsider a once-popular yet controversial idea in stroke research. Neuroscientists believed that, in the aftermath of a stroke, calming overexcited neurons might prevent them from releasing a toxic molecule that can kill neurons already damaged by lack of oxygen. This idea was supported by studies in cells and […]

Poverty, crime linked to differences in newborns’ brains (Links to an external site)

Scanning the brains of newborns, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that maternal exposure to poverty and crime can influence the structure and function of young brains even before babies make their entrances into the world. Here, the university's Lourdes Bernardez prepares an infant for an MRI scan as part of ongoing research.

Scanning the brains of newborns, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that maternal exposure to poverty and crime can influence the structure and function of young brains even before babies make their entrances into the world. Here, the university’s Lourdes Bernardez prepares an infant for an MRI scan as […]

COVID-19 infection linked to higher risk of neuropathy symptoms (Links to an external site)

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found that many people who tested positive for the coronavirus in the early months of the pandemic also experienced peripheral neuropathy — pain, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet — during and following their bouts with COVID-19.

Adding to a growing body of evidence that, for many, problems related to COVID-19 linger longer than the initial infection, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that some people infected during the pandemic’s early months experienced symptoms of peripheral neuropathy — pain, tingling and numbness in the hands and […]

Saligrama part of team that received Wellcome Leap funding (Links to an external site)

Saligrama

Naresha Saligrama, an assistant professor of neurology and of pathology and immunology at the School of Medicine, is part of a team led by Lisa Wagar, of the University of California, Irvine, that has received multiyear, multi-million-dollar funding from Wellcome Leap to use human tonsil organoids to study immune responses.